sub-cultures

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

5 minute read

We’ve all heard about viruses and websites that steal our sensitive private information. Cyberstalking has also become a problem on social media sites. Blogs, Twitter, MySpace and Facebook, in particular, are prone to this sort of abuse. Image by luc legay via Flickr But even cellphone texting can be a problem since you can forward others details where ever you want. Although there are mixed reviews of just how much of a risk there is, there is agreement there is a risk.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

5 minute read

Here is a heads up for parents of kids vulnerable to eating disorders. There is a growing support network on the Internet to help young girls “improve” on their eating disorders. Connecting with others feels supportive, especially those who are like minded. But in fact, the “Pro-Ana” (Pro-Anorexia) groups encourage unhealthy behavior and feed the preoccupation with being thin and losing weight. About 15% of those diagnosed with Anorexia die from complications of starvation.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

12 minute read

Adolescence has a reputation of being a rough road for youths and their parents. While that is certainly true for many, it doesn’t have to be that way. An adolescent’s job is to develop a sense of independence and an identity separate from her parents. The more complicated her relationship with her parents, the more difficult that job is. Sometimes as a way to clearly separate herself from her parent’s way of life, she will adopt a youth subculture.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

4 minute read

The [NY Times][1] published an article last week quoting some sobering statistics about inner city black youth. Six in 10 black men in their 30s who had dropped out of school had spent time in prison. Fifty percent of black youths don’t finish high school. Unemployment for black high school dropouts has peaked at 72%. Orlando Patterson, a professor of sociology at Harvard, wrote a courageous article in the [NY Times][2] today.