recovery

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

2 minute read

Pete Feigal sent me another set of stories now posted to [Dare To Dream Forums][1]. Pete has been a regular contributor. He is now blind, mostly wheelchair bound, but still one of the most inspirational speakers I’ve ever heard on the topic of recovery from disability. Pete Feigal has been battling clinical depression for 30 years, and MS for the last 19. He has spoken nationally over 1400 times in the last 11 years for schools, colleges, prisons, corporations, churches, medical professionals and police forces around the nation.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

1 minute read

John Nash, Nobel prize winning mathematician and subject of the Oscar winning biographic movie “A Beautiful Mind”, delivered a speech to the American Psychiatric Association’s annual conference. He suggests that schizophrenia represents just one facet of the diversity created by evolutionary development of human beings. Mind Hacks “In his talk, he suggested that mental illness may be the result of the otherwise healthy evolution of mental diversity. Applying his specialized understanding of “game theory” to an analysis of mental illness and his own experience with psychosis, the 79-year-old Nobel Laureate suggested that severe mental illness exists in nature as a consequence of the diversification of species, and that it may serve the needs of adaptation by its not infrequent association with genius.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

3 minute read

[Lightening the Load for Mentally Ill Parents][1] The depression had lasted long enough that Loran Kundra thought she should explain her “crying sickness” to her 3-year-old daughter. Kundra had spent days in bed, staring for hours at the same spot. Little Megan had seen her cry too often. Kundra feared the child would blame herself. So Kundra sat Megan down at the top of their stairs at home in Wayne.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

2 minute read

[Mentally ill more likely victim than perp][1] Researchers at the university’s Feinberg School of Medicine say more than one-fourth of individuals with severe mental illness were victims of violent crime during 2004 — a rate nearly 12 times that of the general population. Depending on the type of violent crime, prevalence was six to 23 times greater among people with severe mental illness than among the general population, said lead author Linda Teplin, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Feinberg.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

3 minute read

[’Complicated Grief’ Goes Beyond Depression][1] Researchers estimate that 10 percent to 15 percent of the surviving relatives of people who die naturally experience complicated grief, Prigerson said. She said people who lose someone they were emotionally dependent on are at greatest risk. She is working to get the disorder recognized in the American Psychiatric Association’s next edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The next DSM-V will be published in 2012.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

7 minute read

Self-directed care might seem like a no-brainer to some. After all, doesn’t everyone direct their own medical care? In the case of severe mental illness, too often, this hasn’t been the case. Too many mental health services assume that consumers of services don’t possess the judgment to direct their own care. For too many, accessing mental health services is a dehumanizing power struggle where the people who are trying to “help” are using coercive means to take the right of choice away.