medicare-medicaid-and-insurance

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

2 minute read

Image via Wikipedia Coordination of care is one of the hidden dysfunctional aspects of medical care. The problem is that coordination of care is not reimbursed by insurance companies. Providers are expected to do the right thing and contact other providers between clients. From the outside looking in, that would appear to make sense. Good medical care requires consulting with other providers to ensure everyone is working on the same plan and not against each other.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

3 minute read

Corpus Callosum has great post about an article that appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine. He brimes with pride at the “venerable” journals departure from it’s usual decorum in commenting on Medicare Part D. It is a worthy read, and a withering criticism from a high respected journal with starched credentials. Here is an excerpt from the grand ol’ journal. [Part “D” for “Defective” — The Medicare Drug-Benefit Chaos][2]

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

2 minute read

An informed consumer is critical to ensure quality care. The mental health professional needs feedback from the client to ensure care is effective. That is as much true for counselors as it is for psychiatrists. Insurance companies and now Medical Assistance have been increasingly using medication “formularies” to control the cost of their medication budget. Formularies limit the choice of medication for which the insurance company will pay. Often that is because there are a choice between brand name and generic medications or a choice among a number of equivalent brand names.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

2 minute read

Having trouble with Medicare Part D? You aren’t the only one. [Knight Ridder][1] Many of Medicare’s poorest and most sickly patients are going without their medications because of administrative glitches, misinformation and confusion surrounding the new Medicare prescription drug benefit. Experts had warned that many of the 6.4 million low-income people who get benefits from Medicare and Medicaid could miss out on their life-sustaining medicines when their drug coverage shifted on Jan.