adolescent-development

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

4 minute read

Cognitive Daily today has a nice post on a recent MRI study of brain activity while playing violent games. The question a lot people have on their minds is are gamers more likely to be violent. “It’s well established that playing violent games is associated with aggressive behavior, but it’s difficult to determine whether violent games cause aggression. After all, people who are predisposed to aggressive behavior might seek out violent games.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

2 minute read

Sort of contagious. You see, there are a lot of symptomatic behaviors that are subject to imitation. Drug abuse, cutting, suicidal behavior and eating disorders are just a few examples. When like minded people get together, they inspire imitative behavior in each other. It is unlikely that they are sharing the behavior in each other’s presence, but they are seruptitiously comparing notes. Therapists are very much aware of this potential for contagion.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

10 minute read

Eating Disorders include Anorexia, Bulimia, and Binging Disorder. Unfortunately, most often, eating disorders, even with rigorous studies, have been studied as if they are related disorders. While there appears to be some relationship, between them, there are important differences. Anorexia is one of the most deadly forms of mental illness. The mortality rate is about 10%. Stice (2002) Eating disorders are one of the most common psychiatric problems faced by women and girls and are characterized by chronicity and relapse.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

1 minute read

Isn’t it sad that our most effective and pervasive education sources (TV) and other media is full of images that are not real, raise expectations for ourselves and others, and sets us up to feel inadequate. Those feelings help create in some girls a frenzied obsession with appearance that sometimes leads to eating disorders, some of which are deadly. And they make a few people rich. Thanks to Isn’t it sad that our most effective and pervasive education sources (TV) and other media is full of images that are not real, raise expectations for ourselves and others, and sets us up to feel inadequate.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

2 minute read

I tripped over a surprising bit of news over at Anxiety, Addiction and Depression Treatments. Hispanic teens are suffering the highest rates of mental health and chemical health issues according to a recent CDC press release. In the recent upsurge in interest regarding immigration issues, many Hispanics youths, who themselves are American citizens are being swept up in racism and ill-advised nationalism. No matter where you fall on the issues, the health of American citizens should be something that everyone can agree on.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

3 minute read

Here is another angle on concern about today’s adolescents and young adults. It appears that the malaise affecting African American adolescents and young men stretches across racial boundaries at least somewhat. More young adult males live at home stalling the transition to adulthood. There certainly has always been some cultural spill over from African Americans to Caucasions. Part of the attraction of the “[cool-pose culture][1]” has been the admiration it creates even among whites.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

2 minute read

Here is a very interesting research article about a link between depression and later victimization by domestic abuse. While, I don’t find this surprising, it’s gratifying to see connections that have the potential to influence the focus of psychotherapy. MedlinePlus Young women who had significant depression symptoms as teenagers were 86 percent more likely than their non-depressed peers to report serious partner violence 5 years later. This association still held after a number of potential risk factors, such as race, parents’ education and history of childhood abuse from a caregiver, were taken into account.